Results for "amazon"

Compostable Plates and Bowls from Amazon

August 24th, 2020

In June 2020, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Amazon for allegedly misleadingly advertising disposable plates and bowls as compostable when, according to plaintiffs, the products contain ingredients that do not break down into usable compost. (Nguyen et al v. Amazon.com, Inc., Case No. 20-cv-4042, N.D. Cal.) For more of TINA.org’s coverage of Amazon, click


4Amazonia

January 30th, 2020

Tree-planting nonprofit cuts ties with company selling bracelets to benefit Australia with the tagline, “One Bracelet. One Tree.”


Amazon Brain Supplements Database

January 16th, 2020

Between June 2019 and December 2019, TINA.org searched Amazon.com for “brain supplements” and collected more than 100 examples of search results and product pages in which the product had one or more of the following Amazon designations: Amazon Prime, Fulfilled by Amazon, Sponsored, Ships from and sold by Amazon.com, Editorial recommendation, Best Seller or Amazon’s


Recalled Products on Amazon.com

September 10th, 2019

In August 2019, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Amazon for allegedly failing to tell consumers that some of the products offered for sale by third-party sellers – including Numb-ify Numbing Cream and Gillette Simply Venus Razors – have been recalled or mislabeled. (Edmundson et al v. Amazon.com, Inc., Case No. 19-cv-5835, N. D. IL.)


Sambazon Amazon Energy Drinks

July 30th, 2019

In July 2018, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Sambazon, Inc. for allegedly falsely advertising that its Amazon Energy drinks contain “clean caffeine” when, according to plaintiffs, there is no such thing as “clean caffeine.” Plaintiffs also claim that the company markets the drinks as being “rich in antioxidants” without also disclosing the nutrients in


Amazon Prime

December 1st, 2017

December 2014: The company’s motion to compel arbitration was granted. February 2014: A class-action lawsuit was filed against for allegedly falsely advertising its Amazon Prime Program. Specifically, the complaint alleges that Amazon markets the program as providing free two-day shipping on all Prime-Eligible items in exchange for a $79 annual Prime Program membership fee. The


Amazon Prime’s Free Shipping

October 27th, 2017

May 2014: This case was consolidated with Ekin v. Amazon Services (Case No. 14-cv-244, W. D. WA.). March 2014: Another class-action lawsuit was filed against for allegedly falsely advertising its Amazon Prime Program. Among other things, the complaint alleges that the company promises that Amazon Prime members (who pay $79 a year for membership to


Amazon.com’s “List Price”

October 11th, 2017

September 2017: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the district court’s decision to compel arbitration. February 2016: Plaintiffs appealed the district court’s decision to the Ninth Circuit. (Wiseley v. Amazon.com Inc., Case No. 15-56799, 9th Cir.) October 2015: A federal judge granted Amazon’s motion to compel arbitration finding that plaintiffs agreed to arbitrate disputes


Eclipse Glasses from Amazon

October 5th, 2017

Two class-action lawsuits were filed against Amazon.com for allegedly falsely advertising eclipse glasses. Among other things, the complaints allege that the glasses did not work as advertised and consumers who used the glasses to view the August 2017 total solar eclipse suffered injuries, including headaches and vision loss. One complaint was filed in August 2017


Amazon Prime Membership Fee

August 24th, 2017

In August 2017, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Amazon.com, LLC for allegedly falsely representing that consumers purchasing products through the website would not pay any additional fees when, according to plaintiffs, their accounts were automatically upgraded to the “Amazon Prime” membership resulting in consumers being charged the Amazon Prime membership fee without their permission



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