Results for "essential oils"

Majestic Pure Essential Oils

May 31st, 2018

In May 2018, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Majestic Pure Cosmeceuticals for allegedly misleadingly marketing several varieties of its Essential Oils – including lavender, peppermint, and lemon – as being “100% Pure and Natural” and from natural plants when, according to plaintiffs, the oils contain artificial and synthetic chemicals. (Williams et al v. Epic


Young Living

October 31st, 2019

October 2019: A federal magistrate judge recommended that the district court deny the motions to compel arbitration concluding that, because the Arbitration Clause and the Forum Selection Clause conflicted, there was no “meeting of the minds” (a contract law doctrine requiring parties to agree to the same terms, conditions, and subject matter to form a


Sentry Natural Defense

October 22nd, 2019

In August 2019, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Sentry for allegedly misleadingly advertising its Natural Defense flea and tick repellent as “safe to use around children and pets” when, according to plaintiffs, the product contains essential oils that are toxic and may cause health issues, including skin irritation, vomiting, and muscle tremors. In addition,


Bulletproof Coffee

August 14th, 2019

If you take your coffee with a stick of butter, be wary of miracle health claims.


Aveeno Stress Relief Moisturizing Lotion and Body Wash

August 6th, 2019

July 2019: This case was voluntarily dismissed because the parties reached a settlement agreement, the terms of which have not been disclosed. May 2019: A class-action lawsuit was filed against Johnson & Johnson for allegedly falsely advertising Aveeno Stress Relief Moisturizing Lotion and Body Wash. The complaint claims that the marketing for the products represents


Sentry Natural Defense

November 26th, 2018

In November 2018, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Sentry for allegedly falsely advertising a flea and tick repellent called Sentry Natural Defense as being safe to use around pets when, according to plaintiffs, the repellent contains essential oils that are toxic to pets and may cause serious complications, including skin irritation, vomiting, muscle tremors,


Dr. Axe

October 1st, 2018

A “regular guest expert” on “Dr. Oz,” Dr. Axe’s health advice should also be taken with a grain of salt.


Ad Watchdog Files Complaint Against Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop: TINA.org Calls Out Deceptive Health Claims

August 23rd, 2017

MADISON, CONN.  August 23, 2017 – With Goop, actress-turned-entrepreneur Gwyneth Paltrow has created a wellness empire based on unconventional products such as yoni eggs, Shaman-inspired medicine bags, and crystal therapy readings. Widely panned by the media, Goop’s “alternative” health products may seem harmless. However, ad watchdog, truthinadvertising.org (TINA.org) investigated the company’s marketing practices and found


Goop Database

August 17th, 2017

A TINA.org investigation has catalogued more than 50 instances in which Goop claims, either expressly or implicitly, that its products – or third-party products that it promotes – can treat, cure, prevent, alleviate the symptoms of, or reduce the risk of developing a number of ailments, ranging from depression, anxiety, and insomnia, to infertility, uterine


Soapwalla

June 28th, 2017

FDA warns skin care company to wash treatment claims off its site.


2015 Walmart Error Database

June 29th, 2015

Below are 200 examples of Made in the USA misrepresentations on Walmart.com found between June 22 and July 13, 2015. Group 1: Instances in which the Walmart.com USA label is inconsistent with information contained on the product packaging or manufacturer’s website. Errors 1-35 are from TINA.org’s June sampling; Errors 36-40 are from TINA.org’s July sampling.


Emu Product Claims Questioned by FDA

February 4th, 2013

Emu Products and Management, Inc. claimed on its website that its products could treat health problems including acne, arthritis, and high cholesterol. According to a warning letter from the FDA, these claims extend beyond what is acceptable for supplement advertising and labeling. Examples of some of the claims include: Multi-Omega Gel Caps: “Multi-Omega will …



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