Results for "memory"

FTC Complaint Filed Against Maker of Memory Supplement

September 21st, 2015

 Ad Watchdog Issues Warning to Consumers MADISON, CONN. September 21, 2015 — With an aging baby-boomer population and an estimated 10 million Americans predicted to develop some form of brain disease, supplements claiming to help brain function are flooding the market. Wisconsin-based Quincy Bioscience, the self-proclaimed industry leader, has sold more than two million bottles


Algal-900 DHA

June 10th, 2019

May 2019: A federal judge preliminarily approved a settlement agreement. According to its terms, class members who have proof of purchase or a CVS ExtraCare account that shows a purchase of the product may receive a full refund; class members who do not have proof of purchase but for whom CVS has records showing that


Prevagen Dietary Supplement

May 30th, 2019

In February 2019, a class-action lawsuit was filed against Quincy Bioscience for allegedly falsely marketing that the dietary supplement Prevagen will “improve memory” and support a “sharper mind,” “clearer thinking,” and “healthy brain function” when, according to plaintiffs, the supplement does not improve memory and has no effect on the brain. (Plaintiffs amended their complaint


Comment at FDA Public Meeting on Dietary Supplements

May 23rd, 2019

Comment made by TINA.org executive director, Bonnie Patten at the FDA’s public meeting on Responsible Innovation in Dietary Supplements held on May 16, 2019. Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments today on behalf of Truth in Advertising. TINA.org is a nonprofit consumer advocacy organization that works to out, stop and prevent deceptive marketing.


PBteen Database

May 21st, 2019

PBTEEN MADE IN USA MARKETING Below is a sampling of PBteen marketing materials that claim, either expressly or implicitly, that the following types of products are made in the USA: • Upholstered furniture • Sarah Chloe jewelry • Teen bedroom furniture • Teen accessories • All products listed on this webpage Claims shown below in


Quincy Bioscience’s Prevagen Supplement

May 13th, 2019

April 2019: The Spath case was transferred to a court in New York. (Case No. 19-cv-3521, S. D. NY.) October 2018: The parties agreed to consolidate this case with Vanderwerff v. Quincy Bioscience (Case No. 17-cv-784, D. NJ.), which will be the lead case. August 2018: A class-action lawsuit was filed against Quincy Bioscience for


TruNature Ginkgo Biloba with Vinpocetine

April 10th, 2019

March 2019: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the district court order for summary judgment and remanded the case for further proceedings. September 2017: The named plaintiff filed a Notice of Appeal regarding the summary judgment decision. August 2017: A federal judge determined that Costco and NBTY can offer admissible expert testimony and other


Ginkgold® Products

January 14th, 2019

December 2018: The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the district court’s decision to grant summary judgment and remanded the case for further proceedings. Click here to read the decision. (Case No. 17-5261, 9th Cir.) February 2017: A federal judge granted the companies’ motion for summary judgment finding that plaintiff did not establish that she


Prevagen Products

November 5th, 2018

October 2018: The parties agreed to consolidate this case with Spath v. Quincy Bioscience. The lead case will be Vanderwerff. (Case No. 17-cv-784, D. NJ.) February 2017: A class-action lawsuit was filed against Quincy Bioscience for allegedly falsely representing that Prevagen supplements improve memory and provide cognitive benefits, and that the benefits of Prevagen are


CVS’s Algal-900 DHA Supplement

July 17th, 2018

In July 2018, a class-action lawsuit was filed against CVS for allegedly marketing the supplement Algal-900 DHA as being clinically shown to improve memory and cognitive function and claiming the product is capable of reducing errors by “50% or more” in an “episodic memory test” when, according to the plaintiffs, the product does not work


Cognivex Clarity

June 21st, 2018

The most vexing thing of all? The brain supplement admits there are no studies to back up its claims.



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