Aloe Veritas

October 21st, 2019

For the first time since the program launched to much fanfare at the beginning of the year, the Direct Selling Self-Regulatory Council (DSSRC) has referred a multilevel marketing company’s advertising claims to the FTC for possible law enforcement action.

And it couldn’t have come at a worse time for Aloe Veritas, the Texas-based wellness and skin care company whose health and income claims are FTC-bound. Having just settled a deceptive health claims lawsuit against the Florida-based marketers of two aloe vera-based supplements that resulted in an $18.7 million judgment, the agency will have plenty to draw from when it takes up Aloe Veritas’ advertising claims. Which, on the health side, include claims from Aloe Veritas lifestyle coaches such as these:

Aloe vera leaf is a miraculous healing food that is one of the oldest healing remedies and natural antibiotics in the world. Taken internally, aloe works wonders for assimilation, circulation, and elimination.

 

It is known to purify the blood, reduce inflammation, ease arthritis pain, prevent kidney stones, lower high cholesterol, prevent Candida, boost physical endurance, benefit cardiovascular health, and protect the body from oxidative stress.

 

It also soothes ulcers, hemorrhoids, gastritis, diverticulitis, colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders. Aloe provides recovery from fatigue and aids in muscle function as well as optimal utilization of several vitamins, minerals, and enzymes. It’s alkaline nature, helps to soothe acidosis and alkalinize the whole body.

 

Aloe vera is excellent for healing as it reduces poisons & toxins in the intestinal tract so that they don’t travel up to the liver. This makes it highly beneficial for eczema, psoriasis, acne, rosacea, blood sugar issues, sibo, bloating, gallstones, weight issues, brain fog, dehydration, uti’s, vitiligo, sinus problems, lupus, yeast infections, and strep. Start your detox today!

And on the income claims side, the FTC will consider these marketing statements on the company website, which the DSSRC said convey that the average Aloe Veritas distributor earns “significant income” and/or achieves “extraordinary success” with the company:

We give you the means to achieve an extraordinary level of success.

 

It is completely up to you to decide how much profit you wish to make and which rung on the career ladder you wish to reach.

The DSSRC recommended that Aloe Veritas remove the claims — health and income — from circulation. When the company failed to provide a statement indicating whether or not it would comply with the recommendations or appeal the decision, the DSSRC referred the advertising to the FTC.

Aloe Veritas is not a member of the Direct Selling Association (DSA), the trade organization that created the DSSRC. The company isn’t a DSA member but it’s been sued by one. Before changing its name to Neora as part of a rebranding effort, Nerium International took Aloe Veritas to court for trademark infringement. Nerium International accused Aloe Veritas of trying to benefit off the Nerium name by labeling two skin care products “nerium night cream” and “nerium day cream.” The case was voluntarily dismissed in August 2018.

Aloe Veritas also has a connection to DSA member AdvoCare, which recently agreed to pay $150 million to settle FTC charges that it operated an illegal pyramid scheme. The two are neighbors in Plano, Texas.

TINA.org reached out to Aloe Veritas for comment. Check back for updates.

Find more of our coverage on multilevel marketing here.

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