Arby’s

July 19th, 2019

Arby’s has the meats … in its advertising. The actual sandwiches? Depending on the one you order, not so much.

“The images of their non roast beef sandwiches are a complete misrepresentation of what is actually served at Arby’s restaurants,” TINA.org reader Gregory W. wrote in.

“It would require double or triple the regular ingredients in order to build the sandwiches that they advertise,” Gregory continued. “The Reuben sandwich is probably the most glaring example. What is advertised is three times larger than what is actually served.”

Let’s take a look, shall we? Here’s how the reuben is pictured on the Arby’s website:

 

Not bad. The actual sandwich:

Not great. We can (literally) see Gregory’s point. Let’s give Arby’s another chance. How about the limited time triple decker club, “in all its meaty, cheesy, veggie, honey wheat bready glory,” to quote the Arby’s website. You know the drill. First, the website:

Stacked. The actual sandwich:

Not again. Though to be fair the sandwich looks a lot better from the inside, even if it’s not the towering display of meat and cheese depicted on Arby’s website.

It doesn’t take a connoisseur of fast food to know that Arby’s isn’t the only chain whose ads tend to feature food more mouthwatering than the indeterminate puck of gristle you pull out of the bag. (See our previous ad alerts on Wendy’s and KFC.) But does that make it right?

TINA.org reached out to Arby’s for comment. Check back for updates.

Find more of our coverage on fast food here

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One Response to Arby’s

  1. Paula B. says:

    Try standing in line at fast food restaurants, looking at the pictures of sandwiches. They are completely misleading in a close and personal way. Wendy’s is big for recieving the customer. You order because it looks big and delicious ……… then they hand you a small sandwich and you get really angry after you paid $6 for it. It does need to stop and all of them need to be sued!

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