Help End TEFL Institute’s False Advertising

December 17th, 2013

TINA.org has found that the TEFL Institute, an Illinois company selling “Teaching English as a Foreign Language” training and certification is falsely claiming that it is accredited by an organization called “NATEFLAC.” An investigation, prompted by a consumer complaint filed with TINA.org, found no evidence that such an organization exists. Yet the TEFL Institute, despite admitting that it is not currently accredited, has not removed the claim from its marketing materials on its website. Join TINA.org in requesting that the Illinois Attorney General take action to protect consumers by signing this petition.

TEFL Institute








Dear Attorney General Madigan,

I am writing to express my concern regarding the Chicago-based TEFL Institute. The Institute, which provides training and certification to students who want to teach English as a foreign language overseas, has been claiming on its website that it is accredited by NATEFLAC. But an investigation by truthinadvertising.org (TINA.org) has found no evidence that such an accreditation organization exists or that there are any U.S.-based organizations that accredit private TEFL programs. In fact, TEFL Institute President Ti Ron Gibbs told TINA.org that the company was in the process of being accredited by another body and that he would remove the references to NATEFLAC on the Institute’s website. However, despite a follow-up warning letter from TINA.org sent Dec. 5 to Gibbs, the Institute has not removed the claim.

I respectfully urge you to promptly take action to protect consumers misled by this claim and end the TEFL Institute’s false and deceptive advertising.

Thank you for your urgent attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

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A certification process and quality assurance method that’s designed to distinguish schools that comply with a set of educational standards.  But not all accreditation agencies are created equal.  Many are recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education as being reliable authorities as to the quality of education or training provided by the institutions they accredit.  Those are the ones you want to see when you’re evaluating a school.  Others are unrecognized and some are completely made up, and scam artists will claim their school is accredited by such organizations to make it seem like their institution is legitimate and well-respected when, in reality, it’s a sham.

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