Radio Ads

Published on July 28th, 2020

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The Good Feet Store

As the self-proclaimed “arch-enemy of plantar fasciitis,” the Good Feet Store sells shoe inserts in dozens of storefronts across the country. Their advertisements and website rely on numerous customer testimonials, many of which claim the inserts fixed their plantar fasciitis when nothing else could, allowing them to resume a pain-free life.

But do these claims “stand up” to scrutiny? After a reader sounded the alarm to the Good Feet Store’s radio and social media (YouTube) ads, TINA.org took a closer look.

For starters, plantar fasciitis is a medical condition that is typically diagnosed by a physician and can sometimes require injections, physical therapy and even surgery. And it’s one of several medical conditions the Good Feet Store claims it can address. Also on the list is arthritis, metatarsalgia and Morton’s neuroma.

But according to the disclaimer in the Good Feet ad, the company “is not a medical provider” and cannot “diagnose or give medical advice” with respect to any condition.

But that doesn’t stop them from claiming in advertising to have “3-ring binders” full of satisfied customer testimonials while the Good Feet Store’s BBB page, on which the company has a 1.5 out of 5 star rating, tells a different story. There, numerous customer complaints are logged reporting issues with misrepresented return policies that stick unhappy consumers with ineffective or overpriced products.

So before you run to buy a pair of these orthotics, it’s a good idea to do your research and check with your doctor. Some health insurance policies may cover orthotics if prescribed by a physician. The Good Feet Store doesn’t accept or process insurance, and charges “anywhere from a few hundred to $1500” for a pair of insoles, according to a Good Feet representative TINA.org spoke to by phone.

TINA.org reached out to the company for comment. Check back for updates.

For more of TINA.org’s coverage of medical devices, click here.

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