Your Super

May 28th, 2019

We’re inclined to give the co-founders of Your Super a pass on the questionable use of “your” in the Los Angeles-based supplement company’s name. One of the co-founders is from the Netherlands and the other is from Germany, according to this recent profile of the couple and the company they started in 2015, so English may not be either’s native language (though plenty of native English speakers confuse your and you’re).

In truth, there are more serious problems with the company’s marketing. Specifically, there are claims on social media and on the supplement maker’s website that its superfood powders treat a plethora of diseases, including cancer.

After the above Facebook ad promoting Your Super through the anecdotal experiences of co-founders Michael Kuech and Kristel de Groot as a miracle treatment for the side effects of cancer and eczema surfaced on a staffer’s newsfeed, TINA.org conducted a cursory review of the company’s colorful website.

There, we found a section titled “Happy Customers :)” with row upon row of social media posts from users with nothing but good things to say about the company powders, which have names like Energy Bomb and Forever Beautiful and cost between $30 to $40 per mix. In one Facebook post “liked” by de Groot, a woman thanks Your Super for giving her the ability to fight a number of diseases when doctors gave her limited options:

My Graves Disease won’t leave me, they say. My Hyperthyroidism is here to stay, they say. My Depression is in me, they say? I say…KISS MY LILY WHITE and watch me kick this crap to the curb! Thank you, again, Your Super!

Another Facebook post on the Happy Customers page promotes Your Super as an alternative treatment to chemotherapy for late-stage metastatic lung cancer patients. Others still tout taking Your Super as a way to battle depression, IBS, colitis and leukemia.

Customers can say whatever they want about a product but if a company intends to use that review in its marketing materials, it must ensure that the review complies with the law. And claims to treat, cure, alleviate the symptoms of, or prevent developing disease are simply not permitted by law without FDA approval, which as a supplement and not a drug subject to rigorous study and testing is something that Your Super does not have.

TINA.org reached out to Your Super for comment. Check back for updates.

Find more of our coverage on supplements here.

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